We live in a world where everything is moving too fast and this frenzied race constantly seems to push us into the unbearable demand for immediacy. We no longer take the time to take the time, to savor these moments that life offers us. Between the surge of insatiable consumerism and the search for ease, an era of junk food has unfortunately settled in our lives and our daily lives lack stable and lasting benchmarks.

A chef I interviewed recently said that eating less but well is much better than eating more and poorly. He seems to be right in saying that the pursuit of quality isn’t a luxury when you think about it. Eating good, seasonal, unprocessed products also allows us to have better health. But eating well, aside from its medical benefits, gives us much more than that.

Eating is the basis of this sharing, of these relationships that we create, that we maintain. There is something sacred about it. Surely in the memory of the most beautiful moments of your life, there was something to drink and probably to eat. You may not remember what you consumed, but you probably remember the atmosphere, sensations and emotions you had. And gastronomy is that too. It allows you to create these unforgettable moments. The great starred chef Thierry Marx sums it up very well: “Cooking is bringing memory to the ephemeral. “.

This is where the good and the beautiful come into their own. These moments, whether they are for one, two, or several, romantic, or for work, contain all that makes us human. It’s this exchange, this neutral ground where we break bread and share it. It is not for nothing that this image exists. Isn’t good company ultimately the one with which we can consider sharing a meal? Isn’t the companion the one whose presence is desired for the most vital and convivial act possible? The table is a highly symbolic place and this moment of sharing its strongest expression.

The language of gastronomy is universal. First of all, it’s about taste. Beyond taste, it is the very expression of who we are, where we come from. It is the best ambassador of our culture, our history and our hospitality. The fascination with the cuisines of the world exists for these reasons. To understand a country, to understand a culture, what better way than to taste its typical dishes, its wines or its local drinks. Because the customs that have been passed down through the centuries are found in eating and drinking. To taste a dish is to travel in its land, to discover its flavors, its history, it is to commune with its present and past culture, it is to be seated with its ancestral guests.

A Table For Two is all about bringing you the stories of the people, cuisine and drinks that make these cultures. It’s about giving you a seat at the table and enjoy the experience.

Antoine Abou-Samra

We live in a world where everything is moving too fast and this frenzied race constantly seems to push us into the unbearable demand for immediacy. We no longer take the time to take the time, to savor these moments that life offers us. Between the surge of insatiable consumerism and the search for ease, an era of junk food has unfortunately settled in our lives and our daily lives lack stable and lasting benchmarks.

A chef I interviewed recently said that eating less but well is much better than eating more and poorly. He seems to be right in saying that the pursuit of quality isn’t a luxury when you think about it. Eating good, seasonal, unprocessed products also allows us to have better health. But eating well, aside from its medical benefits, gives us much more than that.

Eating is the basis of this sharing, of these relationships that we create, that we maintain. There is something sacred about it. Surely in the memory of the most beautiful moments of your life, there was something to drink and probably to eat. You may not remember what you consumed, but you probably remember the atmosphere, sensations and emotions you had. And gastronomy is that too. It allows you to create these unforgettable moments. The great starred chef Thierry Marx sums it up very well: “Cooking is bringing memory to the ephemeral. “.

This is where the good and the beautiful come into their own. These moments, whether they are for one, two, or several, romantic, or for work, contain all that makes us human. It’s this exchange, this neutral ground where we break bread and share it. It is not for nothing that this image exists. Isn’t good company ultimately the one with which we can consider sharing a meal? Isn’t the companion the one whose presence is desired for the most vital and convivial act possible? The table is a highly symbolic place and this moment of sharing its strongest expression.

The language of gastronomy is universal. First of all, it’s about taste. Beyond taste, it is the very expression of who we are, where we come from. It is the best ambassador of our culture, our history and our hospitality. The fascination with the cuisines of the world exists for these reasons. To understand a country, to understand a culture, what better way than to taste its typical dishes, its wines or its local drinks. Because the customs that have been passed down through the centuries are found in eating and drinking. To taste a dish is to travel in its land, to discover its flavors, its history, it is to commune with its present and past culture, it is to be seated with its ancestral guests.

A Table For Two is all about bringing you the stories of the people, cuisine and drinks that make these cultures. It’s about giving you a seat at the table and enjoy the experience.

Antoine Abou-Samra

A Table For Two is a production house
specialized in the world of Gastronomy.
We bring you stories about
people, cuisines, wines and much more.

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